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#1 2012-04-15 12:31:01

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

staying healthy

Amy said something about getting sick and losing a lot of weight in the process.  It has been very quiet here, so I'll start something on health.

I'm pretty light and am considered "at risk" when I get sick.  Since I'm single I can report to the doctor if I'm feeling really bad and a visiting nurse is sent out.  They come over on a bicycle with their medical kit and give you a brief checkup and a schedule for reporting so they can figure out if you're getting worse or better.  I had one run off and come back with a supply of electrolyte water last year so I wouldn't get too dehydrated.  If it gets worse a doctor makes a visit. 

It is amazing how much water you can lose when you get sick - that is where the weight loss is as it basically takes three or four days of starvation to lose a kilogram of fat.

I lucked out this year so far.  There was a lot of travel and other than a small cold for a few days, I stayed away from anything more serious.

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#2 2012-04-15 12:34:24

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

Oh - and on staying healthy in general.  I try to eat balanced meals and get a lot of exercise.  I have been injured exercising, so that may not make as much sense as I think it does.  I have asked if there are any tall specific things I should worry about, but the doctors I've asked have all said nothing special other that watching out for low hanging objects and making sure I don't lock my legs when I'm traveling.

My only real problem is dealing with being a vegetarian in a country where pork is almost considered a vegetable and eating enough.

Last edited by jheri (2012-04-15 13:42:18)

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#3 2012-04-15 17:35:20

"Bad News" Bob
Moderator
From: Lexington, NC
Registered: 2003-03-05
Posts: 5,019
Height: 192.25cm

Re: staying healthy

Jheri, not being a vegetarian myself I've often wondered how vegetarians eat a well balanced diet; especially where proteins and crude fats are concerned. I have a friend whose son is a vegan, and honestly the boy seems to be sick constantly, for one reason or the other. My only thought is that his illnesses are ultimately diet related. Meaning he's not eating the things his body needs to supply itself sufficiently to fight off the germs we all encounter on a daily basis. Maybe since I'm not a vegetarian, nor have I ever aspired to become one, I've never looked at the vegetarian diet with anything other than a casual glance. I could do the research myself, but I would rather hear from you some of the things you eat as proteins, and crude fats, in order to balance your diet.


The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.

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#4 2012-04-15 20:21:56

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

"Bad News" Bob wrote:

Jheri, not being a vegetarian myself I've often wondered how vegetarians eat a well balanced diet; especially where proteins and crude fats are concerned. I have a friend whose son is a vegan, and honestly the boy seems to be sick constantly, for one reason or the other. My only thought is that his illnesses are ultimately diet related. Meaning he's not eating the things his body needs to supply itself sufficiently to fight off the germs we all encounter on a daily basis. Maybe since I'm not a vegetarian, nor have I ever aspired to become one, I've never looked at the vegetarian diet with anything other than a casual glance. I could do the research myself, but I would rather hear from you some of the things you eat as proteins, and crude fats, in order to balance your diet.

This is a long subject.  Generally you have to watch and make sure you get enough protein. I try to get at least 2 grams per kg of body weight, which is the recommendation for athletic types.  My doctor says I should consider myself athletic from my running and biking.  I almost always beat that.  I also try to vary my meals, so I have some produce with different colors - reds, greens, yellow and oranges ever day just to be sure.  I have breads, but don't fill up on them and have some good dark chocolate every day.  I also have a handful or so of tree nuts a day (pecans and walnuts mostly:-) and lots of fruit and berries.

Vegans, who don't eat milk or dairy products, have to balance their proteins as many non-animal proteins don't have everything you need.  If you have some beans you should also have some grains - so rice and beans or bread and beans work. Some gains, like quinoa, are complete by themselves and I have that several times a week. I'm not a vegan and drink a lot of non-fat milk as I love milk and since there is a lot of osteoporosis in my family among the older women I exercise and have a lot of calcium to make sure that doesn't happen to me.  I will eat eggs in baked goods, but don't cook them for myself.  It is a quirk of mine.

Because I have problems gaining weight I have to track what I eat, so I have a computer program that keeps track of the proteins, fats, carbs etc. The recommendation was 30% of calories from fat 20% from protein and 50% from carbs.  The fats should have as little saturated fat as possible.  I come pretty close to hitting that without really thinking about it.  My doctor says I don't need to worry about vitamins like I would if I was a vegan.

People are all different and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone else, but it works for me. I think a lot of people get religious over this - especially those who are trying to lose weight.   Some people have real problems keeping pure vegan diets going.  I've never tried to be a vegan and don't know.  Also a lot just like meat and that is fine with me.  I consider what someone eats to be a personal choice.

And I do love ice cream and especially gelato when I can:-)

Last edited by jheri (2012-04-15 20:30:16)

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#5 2012-04-16 22:21:09

Artistamy
Vertically Gifted
Registered: 2005-05-03
Posts: 2,408
Website

Re: staying healthy

I tend to think parts of the blood type diet is true--partly from observation, partly from learning from my friend who just finished school for nutrition (she's on for her masters now). Certain blood types can do just fine on a vegetarian diet; indeed, if they ate a lot of meat, it would be a recipe for heart disease (type A) Marc is type A and can totally live on veggies and be happy. O blood types tend to need meat--if they don't eat it, they can be lethargic, grumpy, etc. (that's for sure me) Meat won't be as prone to causing heart disease in them. Those are the only two I know as both the kids are either one of those. That's about as far as I take it--the book has a whole diet outline with lists of things the types can eat and not eat. That's where it gets crazy to me. Shelly had confirmed a lot of that as we talked. If anything, everyone is an individual and the balance of foods the individual needs will of course be different. I think a lot of the studies showing that eating less saturated fats reduces heart attacks never take into account blood type because its too 'out there'. But it would account for the 'success' of the studies (14% reduction--not a huge one, but makes sense if the A types reduced saturated fats, no?)

Funny thing is that the naturopaths out here pretty much all tell their vegan patients to at LEAST eat eggs. The incoming students to Bastyr University (right nearby-world renowned) are often vegan and as they learn, they begin to raise chickens for the eggs because they realize how much they need those animal-derived nutrients. Their hair stops falling out and they are healthier all around. There are certain vitamins that are simply too hard for the body to absorb without animal fats of some sort. Of course, I'm a granola and will listen to the naturopaths over the MD's about nutrition any day of the week. I'm the same with vets--their education is biased when it comes to food.

Newer research is also questioning the total ban on saturated fats--SOME are bad, others, like butter and coconut oil, are making a comeback. They are even saying whole milk is much preferred to skim as the body needs the fat left in the milk to properly utilize the nutrients, otherwise it's treated like sugar by the body and can be stored as fat.  A good read is "Nourishing Traditions", part cookbook, part research. Very interesting info about fats in there. I stick with fats how they are intended to be--if it's from beef, it MUST be entirely grass-fed, no grains. Same with butter, eggs are best from pastured chickens who can browse on bugs and plants, etc. I don't eat much pork--pigs are filthy and after Contagion, I'm just not interested. That said, I make the exception for bacon. It makes the world go round, LOL! And I don't eat a ton. I try to go for good balance of organic veggies and meats. My body is happiest that way.

People became much less healthy when we started messing with the food supply to make it cheaper and more abundant, and they are thinking more and more that diets with a lot of processed foods are to blame for the heart disease in this country rather than the fat we eat. Just hearing murmurs of that, though. It's not very mainstream at all.

Last edited by Artistamy (2012-04-16 23:34:59)

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#6 2012-04-16 23:02:51

Artistamy
Vertically Gifted
Registered: 2005-05-03
Posts: 2,408
Website

Re: staying healthy

Also have to put a plug in for my new favorite toy--the TRX Suspension Trainer: http://www.trxtraining.com/ I love it because it has all of the stability work I loved from Yoga, and all of the resistance I love from weights. I'm doing a rotation right now of just TRX workouts and its incredible how fast the workout are and how my musculature is changing. I put on muscle quickly, should be a body builder (but...yuck), so now my arms are the size of a smaller man's arms. Can't help that--my goal is strength and stability after this last back episode.

Might be a good option for you, jheri. No need for flexibility, and it's a ton of fun. Building up those stabilizers for all of your joints is key when you are long and lean. I get new workout ideas from Youtube.  I've heard one can be made for about $20, and there are copycats for less. I got the real thing because the handles and foot straps are large enough for our big feet. The competition didn't look big enough.

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#7 2012-04-17 10:52:09

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

Hmm -  I'm type O negative.  Somehow this sounds pretty fishy.  I worry about "natural" diets as we have evolved to make it to about 30 or 35 so we can breed and then we start falling apart.  Also the eating patterns of early humans were vastly different depending on where they lived.  Many of our responses to disease are optimally suited for these short life spans, but not for our longer lives these days.  Cancer in particular may be an artifact of our pushing beyond a natural boundary.  But I do believe different people have differing responses to what they eat and it is important to find something healthy you are comfortable with.

Someone sent a link from the NY Times on the problems with being a vegan (which I am not as I do drink a lot of milk for my bones and don't worry about eggs in things like cakes)

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/1 … oing-vegan

The people I know who are successful vegans don't bother with meat and dairy substitutes, but rather are very good cooks and can make delicious dishes of other foods.  They seem to combine a lot of flavors and probably spend a lot of time cooking.  I am not a good cook and am usually on the run so much that being a pure vegan would probably fail for me.  I'm not terribly motivated to it anyway, but I do like some of the dishes when expert cooks make them.

In the same paper is a short piece on a new book that looks into the question of why the US is so overweight (you can say the same for Canada and a few other countries too)

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/17/opini … r-all.html

It may be just too easy, inexpensive and delicious for most people to have a very unhealthy diet.

But for me, and I suspect many others, exercise is more important to health than diet once you have found a way of eating that agrees with you. Given a choice between spending time cooking or exercise, the choice would be easy for me.

Last edited by jheri (2012-04-17 12:26:57)

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#8 2012-04-17 13:21:38

"Bad News" Bob
Moderator
From: Lexington, NC
Registered: 2003-03-05
Posts: 5,019
Height: 192.25cm

Re: staying healthy

Amy, I use to think the Blood Type Diet was just the latest fade to sell a lot of books. Then I started doing some research into the diet. First by looking a the Blood Type Distribution around the world. Then by examining the historic food sources available in those areas. This showed me dietary trends within in blood groups over thousands of years. Thousands of years that the people living in those areas had to acclimate to the available food sources. So it stands to recent that people from those areas would be best adjusted to the primary food sources of the area. It wasn't until people started migrating to other areas and around the world that dietary problems started becoming an issue. Now most of us only have a vague notion as to where our ancestors originally came from and that's why Blood Type Distribution is so important. It helps narrow down where your ancestors originated and thus allows you to focus of the diet they ate for thousands of years. The diet your body is probably best suited to consume. Granted it's not a perfect science, but neither is it without merit.


The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.

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#9 2012-04-17 21:47:44

Artistamy
Vertically Gifted
Registered: 2005-05-03
Posts: 2,408
Website

Re: staying healthy

BNB--that's how I felt about it. But so many other cultures take it seriously--Japan comes to mind (they ask on job applications as they believe it affects temperament)--that I just gave it some thought and didn't ignore it. I think it has some merit, though it's not the end all be all. It's one of many things to consider with diet. I also find Ayurvedic principles to make sense, too. Eating with the seasons, eating for how your metabolism functions. It has a fancy name and some 'new age' ideas, but it makes sense. And I see the medical establishment eventually agreeing with ancient ideas. They just need studies. Problem is that publishing papers and studies is HIGHLY political, and if you don't have the "right" funding, your research doesn't get published.

Gary Taubes wrote two books based on the various studies endorsed by the government in their nutritional guidelines and pointed out some gaping holes and fancy sidestepping they did to make it fit what they wanted--the more cerebral one is "Good Calories, Bad Calories" and the more pedestrian is "Why We Get Fat And What To Do About It". I have a feeling we'll see guidelines change as the science comes out.  He had some interesting answers to the questions in my mind about things like why the poorest in the US are among the most obese--and still malnourished.

I feel like our modern diseases are either a result of our DNA falling apart as we 'breed' people with more unsuitable genetic traits that we mask with things like braces, plastic surgery, etc. So many of the things that kept people from coming together like even facial structure, good teeth, etc are fixable by modern interventions that we continue to produce people with more genetic flaws. C-sections also do this--I know my pelvis came from my mother who had a c-section. That trait would have died with her had she not. I am obviously happy to have been born, and happy for modern medicine (saved my life twice in labor), but that pelvis goes on when before it would not have. How many genetic diseases have been perpetuated by modern intervention?  We have the luxury to reproduce and not have the 'weaker' DNA die out. No one I know thinks about their family medical history before they decide to have kids. They just have kids and pass on any issues.

Or it can be very diet based. A lot of parents of autistic kids blame GMO's (GMO's are a huge debate here--I tend to side with the organic faction). Diet *can* affect DNA. In our rush to make things bigger and better, stuff has been introduced to our food chain that our bodies cannot handle well. Endocrinologists have found that pesticides, hormones in meats and dairy, plastics, etc. all affect our hormone balance which in turn can cause disease and obesity.

It's probably a combination of both.

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#10 2012-04-28 22:44:49

LT-1
Vertically Gifted
From: New York Metro
Registered: 2005-01-10
Posts: 2,987
Height: 6'3"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I'm on Weight Watchers (again). I'm doing it totally differently this time. WW has a list of "core" foods that mainly consist of lean meats, fish, whole grains, fruits and veggies. The last time I lost 60 pounds, I was on their Core Plan to which I could eat any core foods until I felt satiated. It worked for me. Of course, I had a trainer and I was exercising at a minimum with weights 3 times a week. This time I'm following the Points Plus Plan. I have to track everything I eat and stay within 36 points per day. They offer 49 "bonus" weekly points that I rarely touch. The thing is this plan is really teaching me balance, portion control and healthy eating. I don't know exactly how they do it, but they are constantly evolving the diet plan. I'm never hungry, I eat a varied diet and feel like I could stick with it forever. It's amazing to me that Jheri tracks her food to make sure she's getting enough! I thought only us heavyweights had to do that. I feel much better and I've lost 39 pounds since Jan. 1st. I have 26 more to go. It's amazing to me the tales from the scale have really been helping me manage my whole life. I could go on and on, but I don't want to bore anyone. It's been a really amazing journey that has implications on all aspects of my life.


~It isn't breathing that determines whether you are living or not. - Rev. Sam~

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#11 2012-04-29 00:06:25

Archer
Moderator
From: Illinois, USA
Registered: 2003-08-24
Posts: 4,407
Height: 6' 5"
Website

Re: staying healthy

Not boring at all, LT. We wish you success. Keep us informed if you would.


http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m319/archerev/Links/Stickman2-1.jpg

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#12 2012-04-29 02:53:17

"Bad News" Bob
Moderator
From: Lexington, NC
Registered: 2003-03-05
Posts: 5,019
Height: 192.25cm

Re: staying healthy

My latest get in shape and weight loss scheme involves a closed course of just under four miles and a fifty five pound Boxer female that could probably pull a dog sled with little, or no help. It is her eagerness that has kept me motived, although the more frequently we take our little walks the more capable she becomes, and it seems as though she is getting in peak physical condition at eight to ten times the rate in which my on physical condition is improving.


The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.

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#13 2012-04-29 03:29:04

LT-1
Vertically Gifted
From: New York Metro
Registered: 2005-01-10
Posts: 2,987
Height: 6'3"
Website

Re: staying healthy

"Bad News" Bob wrote:

My latest get in shape and weight loss scheme involves a closed course of just under four miles and a fifty five pound Boxer female that could probably pull a dog sled with little, or no help. It is her eagerness that has kept me motived, although the more frequently we take our little walks the more capable she becomes, and it seems as though she is getting in peak physical condition at eight to ten times the rate in which my on physical condition is improving.

LOL! A man and his dog can do amazing things together. Keep it up! You'll both be better for it.


~It isn't breathing that determines whether you are living or not. - Rev. Sam~

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#14 2012-04-29 11:59:15

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

I was reading that people who have dogs that need walking are in better shape than the regular population - at least in the US.

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#15 2012-04-29 12:02:58

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

I'm reading The First Twenty Minutes by Gretchen Reynolds, who is a medical and health writer for the NY Times. It is on why certain types of exercises work and myths we have - all based on current research. I strongly recommend it to anyone who exercises.

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#16 2012-04-29 12:21:21

Archer
Moderator
From: Illinois, USA
Registered: 2003-08-24
Posts: 4,407
Height: 6' 5"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I read that lifting lighter weights for more repetitions is as effective as lifting more weight. The body reaps all the same benefits. That caused me to think of the older people who, when asked what is the secret to longevity, respond with, "Just keep moving."


http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m319/archerev/Links/Stickman2-1.jpg

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#17 2012-04-29 14:27:46

LT-1
Vertically Gifted
From: New York Metro
Registered: 2005-01-10
Posts: 2,987
Height: 6'3"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I've also found in my weight loss journey that you have to change up the routine occasionally to continue to see results. Hummm, another life lesson. . .


~It isn't breathing that determines whether you are living or not. - Rev. Sam~

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#18 2012-04-29 14:49:04

Sooner
Vertically Gifted
From: Tulsa, OK
Registered: 2005-10-23
Posts: 2,408
Height: 5'11"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I agree. I am a health nut and exercise 6 days a week. I eat less than 2000 cals a day and have for years and gained 15-20 lbs- mostly muscle but weight these bones don't need to carry around. I couldn't lose weight and when I did on very restrictive diets it kept coming back. I kept putting my system in "starvation mode".

I knew it had to be a metabolism thing so I cut back on my meals, cut out all the TV dinner bullshit, artificial sweeteners. fake butter...etc, ate much smaller meals  and snacked (even in the middle of the night) to keep my metabolism working. The fat started dropping off immediately, waist dropped 2" and the muscle stayed on. Now I have to get on the tread mill or whatever and drop the muscle weight and my body is so badly beaten up that may not happen.

In my opinion this is the way to go for the "aging" population- eat less more often and eat what you want.


Sooner

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#19 2013-03-07 13:06:40

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

My brother Jon has a very bad back and sent this.  Since many tall folk have back issues it may be useful. 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 … 131404.htm

The quick message is walking may be very effective for dealing with lower back pain.

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#20 2013-03-12 03:04:46

Sooner
Vertically Gifted
From: Tulsa, OK
Registered: 2005-10-23
Posts: 2,408
Height: 5'11"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I know so many people with bad backs- all sizes. I think everyone should get at least 2-3 opinions before surgery. I had a bad back and had to crawl out of bed. Bought a ranch and started working hard labor and it went away.


Sooner

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#21 2013-03-12 20:16:17

"Bad News" Bob
Moderator
From: Lexington, NC
Registered: 2003-03-05
Posts: 5,019
Height: 192.25cm

Re: staying healthy

Many back related problems can be relieved by core strengthening exercises, and walking. I've had back problems on and off most of my adult life, and they completely disappeared when I started riding bikes on a daily basis.


The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.

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#22 2013-05-08 17:24:15

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

A lot of tall people seem to have back problems and slipped discs.

This is big news from Danish and English research teams.  Apparently there may be a simple way to treat back pain from slipped discs in some patients.  Some of the research is proving out.  Of course more is needed, but it is relatively safe and very inexpensive.

Here is a summary in English

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/ … n-patients

The mechanism they find makes sense, but of course it needs to be checked further.

Last edited by jheri (2013-05-08 17:25:02)

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#23 2013-05-08 17:56:31

"Bad News" Bob
Moderator
From: Lexington, NC
Registered: 2003-03-05
Posts: 5,019
Height: 192.25cm

Re: staying healthy

I just saw something about this a couple of days ago, but the source didn't go into much detail, certainly not as much as this article did. That is very interesting. I know several people who have had spinal surgery, two of them never could cite an incident where they injured their back, only having made it sore from working it their yard. Their doctor told them it was most likely degenerative in nature. Now I wonder if it was degenerative, or bacterial.


The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.

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#24 2013-05-19 12:02:31

Archer
Moderator
From: Illinois, USA
Registered: 2003-08-24
Posts: 4,407
Height: 6' 5"
Website

Re: staying healthy

I have adopted a healthier lifestyle this year. I started with dieting (bleah). Not fun but I have gotten somewhat used to it. I put myself on an 1800 calorie per day diet which should take off about a pound a week. I have gone from 260 to 243 and I am planning to lose more. I still try to exercise by lifting some weights, walking about the property, etc.

My diabetes has been better controlled as a result. My blood sugar readings have averaged in the normal range and I find I can use less insulin. I joined a coop recently and get a produce basket every other week that contains a nice variety of fresh fruits and vegetables at a reasonable price. I have also added healthy Shiitake mushrooms to my diet. Yes, my labors of last year are finally paying off with my own home-grown Shiitake mushrooms. They are loaded with vitamins and anti-oxidants that fight cancer. Besides I really love mushrooms. I am thinking of expanding next year to grow more and other varieties.

The bees had a hard time with the weather last year but I am hopeful for this year. I have four hives right now and hope to add more when I can. We haven't harvested very much honey since getting into beekeeping, but what we have had was the best honey I ever tasted. It is very interesting and I find it relaxing to work with the bees. You wouldn't think that would be the case but it really is fun.

My doctor will be so pleased with my next test results, she'll probably want to take me out to a nice restaurant...okay, maybe not. But at least she won't be chewing me out. I also have a very good friend that stays in touch with me to encourage and support me in any way she can. She is a huge help and I can't thank her enough.

It hasn't all been fun and games. My cousin died on Mother's Day morning. She had been up at 5 am with the 16 month old daughter. She went back to bed and her husband later got up to look after the baby. He tried to wake Dianna for Mother's Day but she was unresponsive so he called 911. She had died in her sleep. At 37, Dianna was the youngest of all us children (my aunt's and my mother). I was 21 and married when she was born. The autopsy revealed a 90% + blockage of a major coronary vessel. Dianna had no knowledge of this blockage and did not foresee the heart attack. My poor aunt was devastated. She said she has lost her twin and her youngest child in less than six months and just doesn't know how she can deal with it. The family will support her in any way possible but even I am having trouble getting around the idea that Dianna is gone.

I must sign off now, finish my coffe and check on my bees and mushrooms. wink


http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m319/archerev/Links/Stickman2-1.jpg

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#25 2013-05-19 22:04:08

jheri
Extremely Tall
From: København, Danmark
Registered: 2010-02-05
Posts: 1,558
Height: 190 cm

Re: staying healthy

It is so awful to hear about someone so young dying.  Your family has been through too much:(

But it is great about your health.  A guy in his mid 30s who lives on my floor was just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It is getting mentioned in the news a lot.  The rate here is not high, but it is growing very quickly.

Last edited by jheri (2013-05-19 22:09:23)

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